LEAD Courses

LEAD 500 | RESEARCH, DESIGN AND EVALUATION OF NONPROFIT PROGRAMS

Units: 4

This course prepares students to undertake the research, design and evaluation process employed in nonprofit organizations. Students will learn the fundamentals of 1) assessing community needs, 2) using theory to guide program design 3) identifying and evaluating research literature that supports program development 4) data-base planning, 5) cultural competence in planning and evaluation of nonprofit programs 6) designing evaluation studies 7) social marketing 8) program monitoring and 9) modifying services based on evaluation results. The course will use both didactic and interactive instruction methods, and students will undertake a project that will provide applied experience in research, design and evaluation of nonprofit programs.

LEAD 501 | NONPROFIT SECTOR: THEORY & PRACTICE

Units: 3 Repeatability: No

This is a survey course that is intended to prepare students for management roles in the nonprofit sector by helping them gain an understanding of America’s “nonprofit nation” and its place relative to nonprofit sectors throughout the world. As such it will explore the development, history and nature of the sector, major issues it is facing, governance structures of nonprofit organizations, basic management and operating strategies. Topics will include: socio-economic and historical perspectives, the legal structure of nonprofits, board responsibilities, regulatory reform and accountability measures, the structure and nature of philanthropy, human resource management, and advocacy. The course is designed as an interactive learning experience that incorporates significant case study and group problem-solving exercises.This course is focused on the integration of theory with practice. All students must affiliate themselves with a nonprofit organization they can refer to and work with.

LEAD 503 | NONPROFIT FINANCE

Units: 3

This course will prepare students to oversee the financial management of nonprofit organizations by focusing on five areas: financial policies and internal controls; financial statement presentation and analysis; revenues, expenses, liabilities, and cash management; budgeting; audit and tax reporting.

LEAD 504 | HUMAN RELATIONS FOR LEADERS

Units: 1

The purpose of this course is to generate an essential diagnostic and strategic understanding of human relations associated with the exercise of leadership and authority in groups, schools, and organizational settings. It is assumed that these dynamics and processes – many of which are elusive and operate beyond our direct awareness – must be taken into consideration if we really want to understand the deeper significance of our actions and expand our zone of discretion by changing ineffective patterns of behavior. The method is based on the premise that learning about human relations, leadership, authority, and organizational dynamics can best be accomplished by experiencing and reflecting on these realities in a direct, immediate and personal way. The course provides opportunities for participants: (1) to examine theories of leadership, authority and group dynamics in order to develop their own definitions and conceptual frameworks for diagnosing and intervening in educational and organizational systems; (2) to study and analyze the dynamic forces that influence the life of groups and organizations -- including those which are intentional and conscious as well as those that are unintended and less conscious; and, (3) to identify and evaluate their own assumptions and behaviors related to the exercise of leadership and authority.

LEAD 505 | DEVELOPING HUMAN CAPITAL

Units: 3 Repeatability: No

Prerequisites: LEAD 501 (Can be taken Concurrently)

A study of how leadership and change in contemporary organizations are connected conceptually and in practice. Students will study models of organizational change, connect them to models of leadership and management and learn collaborative skills and behaviors that will help them be change agents in their organizations and professions. Emphasizes the overarching theme of changing institutions and our society to help them be more humane and responsive to solving the difficult problems that we face.

LEAD 506 | RESOURCE DEVELOPMENT AND MARKETING

Units: 3

This course is intended to examine the fundamental role of marketing and fundraising programs within nonprofit organizations. Students will learn to craft messages and communications materials for key constituencies and stakeholders, identify and develop a well-balanced base of support from individual donors and institutional funders (foundations, corporations, government agencies), and gain knowledge of common fundraising cycles and philanthropy programs. Students will learn about developing a brand and marketing strategy and implementing tactics including public relations, social media and advertising. The course will also cover the cultivation and solicitation of individuals, the role of boards in fundraising, grant writing, and special events. Throughout the course, there will be discussions on ethical issues, technical tools and skills and the management of fundraising and marketing departments within an organization. The goal of this course is to ensure that each student gains a broad and sophisticated understanding of resource development/fundraising and marketing/communications.

LEAD 507 | COMMUNITY PARTNERSHIPS & CIVIC ENGAGEMENT

Units: 3 Repeatability: No

The study of social change is important for non-profit administrators to understand the historic and regional environment in which they operate. Students will be exposed to a variety of change models and their inherent assumptions including but not limited to: revolution, labor, civic rights, and environmental movements of social change. Special emphasis will be placed on the categorical silos, which exist within San Diego. Participants will develop a model of social change, which will guide their analysis and practice. Participants will conduct a community analysis on strategic organizations with examination on the organizational agenda of nonprofit organizations, civic associations, regional initiatives, and focus of this course will center on creating change within a practice arena.

LEAD 508 | GRANT MAKING FOR THE GREATER GOOD

Units: 2

Prerequisites: LEAD 501

This course will have two goals. The first is for students to assume the role of Program Officers, two teams of four, as they learn how foundations function as grantmakers in light of both best practice and emerging trends such as accountability, transparency and generational wealth transfer. The second goal is for students to implement in “real time” a Request for Proposal (RFP) to be sent to selected regional nonprofits and make evidence based recommendations for approval of two $10,000 grants to be funded by the Donald and Elizabeth Dickinson Foundation (DEDF). This is a two-­unit elective course.

LEAD 509 | LEGAL ISSUES, HUMAN RESOURCES AND RISK MANAGEMENT

Units: 2

This course is intended to prepare students for management roles in the nonprofit sector by helping them become familiar with the basic forms of not-for-profit entities and the principal differences in their structure, formation and corporate governance regimes. It is also designed to acquaint students with methods and techniques for managing typical risks involved in the operation of nonprofit enterprises, including risks associated with employment matters, fiscal matters (e.g. fundraising, financial accounting), preserving tax-exempt status and lobbying, contract performance, real property matters, public relations and the like. The course is focused on practice and will incorporate case study and group problem-solving exercises based on actual student or faculty experiences to provide interactive classroom learning. Special permission required for students not enrolled in the nonprofit management program.

LEAD 510 | BOARD DEVELOPMENT

Units: 2 Repeatability: No

This course intends to prepare students to develop and manage boards of directors of voluntary sector organizations. Topics include legal and operating definitions, the purpose, function, role and appropriate board structures; supporting systems; how to assemble a board of directors; how to build positive board/staff relationships; how to coordinate the work of a board; how to prepare and manage board information flow; and how to evaluate board effectiveness.

LEAD 511 | STRATEGIC PLANNING AND POSITIONING

Units: 2

Many nonprofits think strategic planning is accomplished principally through a board retreat where members are asked to work with senior staff on deliberating the best course of action for their organization. While retreats are critical to the planning process, effective planning ideally involves considerable information gathering and analysis before the discussion begins in earnest. Organizations need to understand how their nonprofit fits within the context of trends and its place in the market, take a careful look at potential allies and competitors, collect information from stakeholders of all types about their wants and needs and assess the capabilities of their organization to meet these needs within its defined market niche. This course will focus on methods of identifying strategic questions and directions for nonprofit organizations by taking students through planning processes with “client” organizations. Special permission required for students not enrolled in the nonprofit management program.

LEAD 512 | BEYOND COLLABORATION

Units: 1

This course intends to prepare students for the development of appropriate sustaining and effective inter-organizational relationships that assist them in fulfilling their organizational mission. Topics include life systems theory; definitions and distinctions among such arrangements as cooperation, collaboration, competition, co-opetition, partnership, networking and coalition building; identifying and developing structures and procedures; moving through the stages of development and establishing evaluative methods.

LEAD 513 | ADVOCACY SKILLS AND STRATEGIES

Units: 2

Successful advocates utilize a toolbox of strategies to advance their cause. These strategies include: understanding the lobbying regulations, knowing the how the legislature and congress work officially and behind the scenes, understanding regulatory reform, undertaking research which provides facts and figures to bolster a given argument, knowing how to build partners across sectors who will support the cause, understanding how to use the media and build public support. This class will provide students with a framework for conceptualizing and carrying out advocacy campaigns. Each student will be asked to apply what is learned in class to the development of a comprehensive advocacy campaign. Students may work individually but are encouraged to work in small groups on a specific public policy or state legislative campaign.

LEAD 514 | PUBLIC SPEAKING

Units: 1

This course will provide students with the skills required to engage audiences and individuals who are potential donors and supporters of nonprofit organizations. Topics include: research and analysis of audiences; development of presentations focused on the benefits to the audience; practice of presentation skills that ensure masterful delivery; the extemporaneous speech; development and use of appropriate visual aids; handling of the question and answer period; use of humor, personal stories, analogies and the call to action. The class will be participatory and will include research and videotaped presentations. Special permission required for students not enrolled in the nonprofit management program.

LEAD 515 | SOCIAL ENTREPRENEURSHIP-­INNOVATIONS IN CREATING SOCIAL VALUE

Units: 2-3 Repeatability: No

This two credit (see Appendix F for 3 credit option) 10-­week course will study the phenomenon known as social entrepreneurship, in both theory and practice. Social entrepreneurship is the study of business strategies, tools and approaches that address intractable social problems. Said efforts may take place within a nonprofit or for-­profit setting (the latter in several different corporate structures/legal forms). Students will learn about the history and evolution of social entrepreneurship. The course will pay particular attention to the most successful social entrepreneurial ventures across the globe. Students will critically analyze and evaluate a variety of innovative approaches that are being employed to address difficult social problems. Students will consider the advantages and disadvantages of the many forms of social entrepreneurship, and the legal structures that differentiate them. Working in teams, students will create their own social venture, including a viable busines.

LEAD 517 | CAPITAL AND ENDOWMENT CAMPAIGN PLANNING

Units: 2

This course is designed to broaden the student’s understanding of advanced fundraising activities, with a particular emphasis on capital and endowment campaigns. Building upon student’s prior coursework, the class allows students to apply their understanding of organizational strategic planning to prepare, plan and launch successful major gift fundraising efforts. Coursework is based upon students’ analysis and discussion of actual case studies or field work with nonprofit organizations. Special permission required for students not enrolled in the nonprofit management program.

LEAD 518 | NONPROFITS AND CIVIL SOCIETY IN GUATEMALA

Units: 2

This course is designed to provide theoretical and practical knowledge about the nature of the nonprofit sector in Guatemala, a post-conflick society and a developing country. In particular, we will explore the dynamic role of human service agencies - both INGOs (internationally operated nonprofits) and Guatemala-based nonprofits in peace-building. Students will be introduced to the challenges these nonprofits face serving multi-cultural populations within a country still troubled by serious violence.

LEAD 518I | NONPROFITS AND CIVIL SOCIETY IN GUATEMALA

Units: 2 Repeatability: No

This course is designed to provide theoretical and practical knowledge about the nature of the nonprofit sector in Guatemala, a post-conflick society and a developing country. In particular, we will explore the dynamic role of human service agencies - both INGOs (internationally operated nonprofits) and Guatemala-based nonprofits in peace-building. Students will be introduced to the challenges these nonprofits face serving multi-cultural populations within a country still troubled by serious violence.

LEAD 519I | UNDERSTANDING BI-NATIONAL NONPROFITS IN THE US-MEXICAN BORDER

Units: 2 Repeatability: No

The proximity to the Mexican border provides a unique opportunity to expose and prepare students for how to work more effectively in an increasingly international environment. Students will work in groups of two to three and with an associate from an assigned nonprofit that spans the Mexico and United States border to analyze the particular nature of that organization and the challenges it faces. This course will include two days and one night in Tijuana. In addition, each student must have a valid passport prior to enrolling in this course and be willing to travel to Mexico. While a command of the Spanish language is not required, supplementing reading materials will be provided to students that are in both English and Spanish. [NOTE: Required reading will be in English.].

LEAD 520 | VOLUNTEER ENGAGEMENT

Units: 1 Repeatability: No

This course is designed to enhance students’ understanding and practice of effective volunteer engagement in community-based organizations, particularly nonprofits. It uses an organizational development approach that connects research with practice and provides students with tools and strategies to better engage volunteers in their work.

LEAD 522 | THEORIES OF ORGANIZATIONAL LEADERSHIP AND CINEMATIC ANALYSIS

Units: 3

This course serves as an opportunity to explore leadership theories as reflected in films including movies, documentaries, and biographies. Film provides the mechanism for an in-depth exploration of various approaches to leadership including key terms and distinctions commonly used in the leadership literature. The course is more a leadership theory course framed by film than a film course that focuses on the subject of leadership. With Gary Yukl’s popular leadership textbook as a guide students will develop a working understanding of the trait, behavior, power-influence, situational and integrative approaches to leadership.

LEAD 530 | CREATIVE LEADERSHIP

Units: 1

This weekend course provides an introduction to methods of self-awareness, coaching and leader development in cooperation with the Center for Creative Leadership. This course will provide students with an opportunity to learn about several instruments used in leader assessment and they will gain insights into methodologies for increasing the capacity of leadership in organizations.

LEAD 533 | FOUNDATIONS OF LEADERSHIP COACHING

Units: 3

The primary goal of this course is to offer an introduction to the theory and practice of leadership coaching. Special emphasis will be placed on core competencies necessary for effective coaching and ethical practice. In particular, students will be guided through a coaching process that is holistic in nature, focused on developing the individual as an instrument of the coaching engagement. The model spans human development theory, organizational change processes, positive psychology application, and leadership development from an action logics (stage theory) perspective. The course also offers experiential learning opportunities for students to make initial discoveries about their emergent coaching style through “real time” peer-to-peer and client-based coaching practice.

LEAD 535I | MODELS OF PARTICIPATORY LEADERSHIP

Units: 3

This intensive summer course is an opportunity for participants to be exposed first-hand to a unique organizational model of participatory leadership, management, employee ownership and decision making by attending lectures and visiting sites at the Mondragón Corporación Cooperativa (Mondragón) in Mondragón, Spain. Students will become acquainted with Mondragón’s unique leadership, management, educational, training, financial and human resources systems, as well as its globalization initiatives. Participants will also learn the core values that support Mondragón, which are based on a balance between organizational and personal needs, solidarity with each other and the community, and economic and social justice. Finally, participants will become acquainted with the institutionalized policies, processes and practices that support Mondragón’s economic and social success.

LEAD 544 | BUILDING PRACTICE IN COACHING AND CONSULTATION

Units: 2 Repeatability: No

Prerequisites: LEAD 533 or LEAD 566 (Can be taken Concurrently)

This course is designed to provide coaching and consultation students with the necessary tools to build their professional practice. Particular emphasis is placed on the technical, legal, and financial considerations that are essential to provide effective delivery of coaching and consultation services to individual clients and organizations. The aim of the course is for each student to be equipped with a sufficient robust business approach to be able to launch their practice upon completion of all program and credentialing requirements. While this course can be taken as freestanding offering, it is required that students taking the Leadership Coaching course series first take Foundations in Leadership Coaching and be enrolled in Coaching and Mentoring course OR provide evidence of relevant other professional experience. In the latter instance, permission of the instructor is required.

LEAD 545 | SURVEY OF LEADERSHIP THEORIES

Units: 3

This course presents a survey of the many theories that address leadership from a multi-­disciplinary perspective. Through this course students will examine leadership through various theoretical lenses and frameworks. By looking at various approaches to leadership students will develop a more sophisticated understanding of the phenomenon and thereby increase their own abilities to influence others for the common good.

LEAD 547 | ACTION RESEARCH METHODS I

Units: 3

In this course students critically reflect on the intellectual and practical questions which guide action research and develop a proposal for an action research project. This course will address theoretical, philosophical, and epistemological questions about action research. We will discuss the tradeoffs that come with action research compared to more traditional research—how can insider status better inform research, and what might we lose compared to other forms of traditional research methods? How can the action research frameworks better solve organizational problems, and on the other hand what insights may be lost by focusing on a single organization’s questions or problems?.

LEAD 549 | RESEARCH METHODS

Units: 3

This course is designed to help you become critical and wellinformed consumers of research. The course provides students with the basic principles of wellconducted research through readings and analysis of research studies from both the popular and academic settings and teaches them to understand the power and limitations of social science research.

LEAD 550 | INTEGRAL LEADERSHIP THEORY

Units: 3

This course provides an essential and theoretical understanding of leadership and authority and is designed as well to generate personal insights into one’s own patterns of response to social forces and skills for leadership. The course has a strong experiential component that continually provides participants with opportunity to test and integrate their learning with experience.

LEAD 551 | HUMAN RELATIONS FOR LEADERS

Units: 3

The overall purpose of this course is twofold: 1) to acquaint students with the dynamics of organizational change and the challenges they present for those who hold positions of formal authority and 2) to help students develop the personal skills and discipline necessary to exercise leadership effectively. The course draws on leadership studies, complexity and systems theory as well as insights from the social sciences to develop a theoretical and practical framework for diagnosing and intervening in groups and organizations. The design provides a kind of “laboratory” setting that duplicates to some extent the dynamics that occur regularly in organizations so that participants can test and integrate their learning with actual experiences from the groups and organizations to which they belong.

LEAD 552 | SCHOOL LAW FOR ASPIRING LEADERS

Units: 3

Students learn about issues concerning the authority, power and liabilities of administrators as well as the legal status of teachers, students and others involved in the educational program. Course provides prospective school leaders with understanding of how law guides day-to-day decision making in key areas and the consequences for violating policies.

LEAD 553 | INSTRUCTIONAL LEADERSHIP AND SUPERVISION I

Units: 2

Focuses on the role of school leaders in shaping a school culture that values teaching and learning as the center of the school’s work. Attention is given to the resources and skills needed to lead instructional improvement. Students are required to analyze data through classroom observations and develop an action plan to improve teaching and learning.

LEAD 554 | INSTRUCTIONAL LEADERSHIP AND SUPERVISION II

Units: 2

Prerequisites: EDLD 553 or LEAD 553

This course continues the work of LEAD 553, focusing on the development of students’ capacity to analyze instructional practice and lead improvement of teaching and learning. Students are required to analyze data through classroom observations and develop an action plan to improve teaching and learning.

LEAD 555 | LEADERSHIP AND ETHICS

Units: 3

Designed to promote an understanding of the philosophical, religious and civic traditions of leadership as the ethical construct of democratic practice in organizations, institutions and societies. Students gain greater awareness of the contradictions that influence contemporary organizations, especially in U.S. society. Also addresses non-Western views of morality.

LEAD 556I | CULTURE AND LEADERSHIP

Units: 3

Based on the extensive research in anthropology, crosscultural psychology,leadership, and organizational behavior, the course reviews the impact of culture on leaders and their followers at the national, group, and organizational levels. It provides a thorough review of relevant theories and applies them to helping students develop the cultural mindset that is essential to effective leadership in today’s global and interconnected world.

LEAD 557 | LEADERSHIP AND SPIRITUALITY

Units: 3

The commonalities within all the great spiritual traditions are emphasized in this graduate course. Spirituality is viewed as an orientation that calls for deep involvement in the world and spiritual practices are considered that enable leaders to reflect on how they go about their daily lives. During a culminating activity, participants share their insights regarding how leadership can elevate the human spirit and inspire actions with the potential for moving the world toward peace and justice.

LEAD 558 | LEADERSHIP AND THE DYNAMICS OF SCHOOL ORGANIZATIONS

Units: 3

Prepares students to plan, organize, manage and evaluate the day-to-day operations of a school, focusing on the development of a productive school culture that supports learning for teachers and students. Candidates learn strategies for working with school stakeholders, sharing decision-making and providing sufficient resources for the diverse needs of students. The course builds candidates’ understanding of and skill in, responding to the complex political forces that shape organizational life.

LEAD 559 | LEADERSHIP AND ORGANIZATIONAL CHANGE

Units: 3

A study of how leadership and change in contemporary organizations are connected conceptually and in practice. Students will study models of organizational change, connect them to models of leadership and management and learn collaborative skills and behaviors that will help them to be change agents in their organizations and professions. Emphasizes the overarching theme of changing institutions and our society to help them be more humane and responsive to solving the difficult problems that we face.

LEAD 560 | SCHOOL LAW FOR PRACTICING ADMINISTRATORS

Units: 3

This course focuses on the preparation of practicing school leaders to applying knowledge of the law to guide day-today decision making in their roles as administrators. Participants will develop a deeper understanding of and ability to apply, state and federal law in areas vulnerable to litigation that are under the purview of the school site leader.

LEAD 561 | LEADERS EXPLORING ADMINISTRATIVE POSSIBILITIES

Units: 3

This course engages participants in initial leadership development prior to entering an administrative credential program. This program provides candidates opportunities to learn more about their leadership capacity in a three day summer institute and continued work from September through March in monthly seminars.

LEAD 562 | LEADERS EXPLORING ADMINISTRATIVE POSSIBILITIES I

Units: 2

This course is the first segment of a 3-unit LEAP program. The LEAP program fosters awareness and knowledge of leadership, encourages participation in leadership activities and builds a basis for pursuing career opportunities in leadership positions in schools. In this course, we provide initial leadership development and recruitment for educators interested in future site leadership opportunities. Highly qualified individuals will be provided information, experience and support to move them toward more opportunities for teacher leadership and for some students, toward a career in site leadership.

LEAD 563 | LEADERS EXPLORING ADMINISTRATIVE POSSIBILITIES II

Units: 1

Prerequisites: EDLD 562 or LEAD 562

This course is the second segment of the LEAP program. This course follows LEAD 562 and continues initial leadership development and recruitment for educators interested in future site leadership opportunities. Candidates take on more responsibility as a teacher leader and document and reflect upon those responsibilities. Some candidates may begin working toward a career in site leadership. In this second semester, candidates will complete their Individual Learning Plan, complete three meetings with the mentor, complete a portfolio of their work and develop a Poster Presentation. Using a Protocol, the candidates will present the poster (reflecting their learning) to a group of critical peers and receive feedback.

LEAD 564 | SUPPORTING TEACHERS FOR INSTRUCTIONAL IMPROVEMENT

Units: 2

This course supports the development of leadership knowledge and skills for creating and supporting strategic goals for the improvement of teaching and learning. This job-embedded course focuses on the site-based leadership role and experiences, integrating instructional and leadership theories with educational practice.

LEAD 565 | DYNAMICS OF RACE, GENDER AND CULTURE IN HIGHER EDUCATION

Units: 3

The purpose of this course is to provide students with an opportunity to discuss, reflect and explore issues of power and privilege in relation to their work as leaders in higher education. In this course, students will have opportunities to study and discuss how colleges and universities are responding to the growth of diversity on their respective campuses; critically examine the research related to current challenges in higher education related to diversity; develop a greater appreciation and understanding of their own and other cultural groups; examine and discuss issues of power and privilege using multiple lenses to investigate the impact of these issues in the context of higher education.

LEAD 566 | COACHING AND MENTORING

Units: 3 Repeatability: No

Prerequisites: LEAD 533

This course provides the opportunity for students to acquire a clear understanding of coaching and mentoring as leadership tools. Students will learn coaching skills, become familiar with coaching models, be exposed to a variety of assessment techniques and reflect on ethical and other professional issues in the world of coaching and mentoring. They will also analyze coaching processes and learn fundamental concepts surrounding feedback, delegation and performance improvement.

LEAD 567 | WRITING FOR PUBLICATION

Units: 3

This course is an intensive writing and research experience designed to introduce students to and mentor them through the writing, research, revision and publication or presentation processes. Topics covered include: organizing and reviewing the literature; improving grammar, style and mechanics; strengthening presentation skills; and preparing for the publication process. Students read about research and publication, critique and evaluate work done by peers in the course and receive feedback on their writing and research topics from the professor.

LEAD 568I | GLOBAL PERSPECTIVES IN HIGHER EDUCATION

Units: 3 Repeatability: Yes (Can be repeated for Credit)

The purpose of this course is to provide students with an opportunity to explore, discuss, reflect, and analyze various issues impacting higher education from a global perspective. These issues include, but are not limited to access, equity, economic development, and social mobility. Particular attention will be paid to historical developments and interventions (e.g., affirmative action and other initiatives) from the government, non-government organizations, and private and public universities seeking to address educational opportunity and/or economic innovation. The specific focus of the course will be contingent on the geographic location as the international context impacts the critical issues addressed. Examples of potential countries under the purview of this course include Brazil, United Arab Emirates, Cuba, Morocco, Italy, France, and South Africa.

LEAD 569 | MAKING MEANING AND THE COLLEGIATE EXPERIENCE

Units: 3

The purpose of this course is to examine and understand significant human development theories used within the context of higher education. Students will be asked to make meaning of the self, the other and the systems, personally and professionally. This course requires students to apply college student development theories to students as well as themselves in critical ways. Students will be asked to work individually as well as in teams on a project-based learning project aimed at promoting the intersections between theory and practice.

LEAD 570 | HUMAN SERVICES ADMINISTRATION

Units: 3

Topics include employee selection, procedures and policies, salary and fringe benefit management, staff appraisal, tenure practices and non-renewal and dismissal procedures.

LEAD 571 | HISTORY AND PHILOSOPHY OF HIGHER EDUCATION

Units: 3

This course is designed to provide students with historical and philosophical contexts for understanding contemporary practices and issues in higher education. Through an understanding of major philosophies of education, students will examine the developmental trajectory of higher education in the United States. The course includes opportunities to explore the complexity of philosophical views and historical events that have shaped the way colleges and universities operate today. Students will shape a personal philosophy of education by identifying the ideologies behind educational systems, curricula and institutional goals and by determining which aspects of those ideologies best represent their own values and ideas.

LEAD 572 | LEADERSHIP AND CONTEMPORARY ISSUES

Units: 3 Repeatability: No

National and global issues requiring leadership are presented as challenges to future leaders. Topics may include: social and political changes; environmental change and sustainability; the impact of technology; and generational changes. These issues all impact organizations and how we lead and require courage, commitment and compassion on the part of leaders, as well as technical knowledge and critical thinking skills in order to transform the potential of today’s world into a global community of justice and peace.

LEAD 573 | ECONOMICS OF EDUCATION

Units: 3

This course introduces students to the basics of economic analysis and then uses these techniques to examine some of the most important, but least understood policy issues on the national agenda, including: human capital theory and the returns to education; educational labor markets and the factors that influence them; how local schools are funded and the voucher movement; trends in college and university pricing; market failure and the governmental provision of student loans; and the increasing grant-loan imbalance in higher educational finance.

LEAD 574 | GENDER AND LEADERSHIP

Units: 3

The psychological literature related to women’s development of self is discussed against the background of women in history and in society as a foundation for topics related to the development of leadership for women. Special topics of concern to women as leaders will be explored.

LEAD 575 | THE COMMUNITY COLLEGE

Units: 3

A historical review of the development of community colleges and their relationship to the higher education movement. Includes a study of the philosophy and application of the open-door policy and summary of the functions of community colleges.

LEAD 576 | COMMUNITY COLLEGE LEADERSHIP

Units: 3

Designed to help prepare candidates for administrative positions in community colleges. Topics included the nature and purposes of community colleges; their assets, problems, issues, practices and innovations; faculty relations, collective negotiations and professional development; and possible future developments. Finances, governance and administrator-board relations are also discussed.

LEAD 577 | HIGHER EDUCATION POLICY

Units: 3

This course examines contemporary higher education public policy issues and provides a general introduction to the policymaking process in the United States. This process will be examined from multiple perspectives, including those from within the university as well as those from without. At all levels, key participants will be identified and their behavior analyzed to understand the importance of structural incentives embedded in the process. To develop the skills necessary to do this sort of high-level policy analysis, students will learn how to research and write policy briefs and analyses based on real, contemporary problems in higher education.

LEAD 578 | HIGHER EDUCATION ADMINISTRATION

Units: 3

An introduction to the management of public and private colleges and universities, this course will explore the nature of academic governance, patterns of decision making among middle- and senior-level academic administrators, as well as the challenges involved in shared authority. Leadership philosophies of prominent educational leaders will be examined, as well as campus mission statements, administrator-board and public relations, local and state policy issues and the role of administrators in creating a campus culture that nurtures diversity, equity and access.

LEAD 579 | EXPERIMENTAL TOPICS

Units: 1-3 Repeatability: Yes (Can be repeated for Credit)

This course number is used by SOLES for experimental topics courses. The title and content of each 579 course will vary by topic and program/department. If more than one 579 course is offered during a single semester, section numbers will allow for identification of the course.

LEAD 579I | EXPERIMENTAL TOPICS: INTERNATIONAL EXPERIENCE

Units: 1-3 Repeatability: Yes (Can be repeated for Credit)

This course number is used by SOLES for experimental topics courses. The title and content of each 579 course will vary by topic and program/department. If more than one 579 course is offered during a single semester, section numbers will allow for identification of the course. This I-designated course will meet the SOLES International Experience requirement.

LEAD 580 | CONSULTING TO GROUPS

Units: 3

This course provides practical and experiential training in consulting to small groups. It is especially geared to building the capacity needed to mobilize groups and organizations undergoing rapid change or experiencing significant turmoil by enhancing students’ ability to match content, technique, context and delivery.

LEAD 581 | SPECIAL TOPICS IN LEADERSHIP STUDIES

Units: 1-3 Repeatability: Yes (Can be repeated for Credit)

The purpose of this course is to provide graduate students with an opportunity to earn graduate credits in the Leadership Studies program for participating and/or attending conferences, institutes, or other events related to their growth as a scholar and/or professional. Students enrolling in the special topics course(s) will be responsible for attending all conference events, completing the assignments as noted in your syllabus and other papers and/ or projects as assigned by the professor of record. Each new course that is offered will be reviewed and approved by the program area (specialization area) and the Leadership Studies department chair, before being added to the course schedule.

LEAD 583 | SPECIAL TOPICS I

Units: 1

This series of seminars address the critical operational issues of school leadership, providing candidates with the opportunity to develop their understanding of such areas as school counseling, teacher evaluations, conflict management, school site-based budgeting and personnel policies and procedures.

LEAD 584 | SPECIAL TOPICS II

Units: 2

This series of seminars address the critical operational issues of school leadership, providing candidates with the opportunity to develop their understanding of such areas as school counseling, teacher evaluations, conflict management, school site-based budgeting, personnel policies and procedures, creating parent partnerships and organizing the school to ensure parent/community support.

LEAD 585 | LEADERSHIP FOR CHANGE

Units: 3

This course provides participants with opportunities to: examine theories of leadership and authority; to study and analyze the dynamic forces (both conscious and unconscious) that influence the life of groups and organizations; and to identify and evaluate their own assumptions and behaviors related to the exercise of leadership and authority.

LEAD 586 | LEADING DIALOGUE

Units: 3

The purpose of this course, is to provide graduate students with an opportunity to receive three graduate credits in the Leadership Studies program for participating in an experiential training event related to their growth as a scholar and/or professional. This workshop is conducted through the SOLES affiliation with Public Conversations West, the San Diego based arm of an international organization devoted to promoting public dialogue on contentious and complex issues. This course blends practice and theory, inviting students to learn through active engagement with dialogue methodologies while gaining grounding in various conceptual frameworks on dialogue.

LEAD 587I | COMMUNITY MODELS OF LEADERSHIP – SRI LANKA GLOBAL STUDY

Units: 3

This course is designed to understand social movements and leadership within communities. In particular, this course examines an alternative view of leadership from Western thought by exploring Sarvodaya in Sri Lanka. Sarvodaya, which means “Awakening of All,” is the largest people’s organization in Sri Lanka and is composed of over 12,000 villages. Sarvodaya represents one of the world’s largest grassroot mobilizations. A collaboration of Gandhian thought and Buddhist belief, Sarvodaya serves Sri Lanka and the global community through its social action works in peace building, education, relief efforts, and development. Students have the opportunity to see various aspects of Sarvodaya’s model including: training and education, peace center, volunteerism, community organization, and headquarters. Particular attention will be attributed to the unique culture and location of Sri Lanka and how these factors have influenced community development, social movement, and leadership. Excursions to cultural and historical areas of significance are facilitated in conjunction with course content. Students engage in serviceactivities within Sarvodaya villages.

LEAD 588 | DIVERSITY AND THE PREPARATION OF SCHOOL LEADERS

Units: 2

This course examines the concept of diversity from multiple perspectives, investigating the impact of issues of power and privilege in relation to candidates’ work as instructional leaders and developing candidates’ knowledge, skills and self-reflective practice.

LEAD 589 | CAPSTONE SEMINAR

Units: 1-2 Repeatability: Yes (Can be repeated for Credit)

The Capstone Seminar is designed to provide Master’s in Leadership Studies students with an opportunity to integrate their learning in the program through an e-­portfolio and/or action research project. Students are expected to work with a member of the Department faculty as an advisor for their capstone while participating in this course. Each session is devoted to peer-­to-­peer interaction and feedback on the progress being made to complete this graduation requirement. Particular attention is given to making use of the knowledge gained in the prerequisite research courses. The aim is to support students as they focus on deepening their leadership philosophy, reflect on their coursework learning, explore the interconnections of self and system that will most meet their needs as future leadership professionals. Successful students will continuously examine and refine their work so as to better understand and apply leadership concepts to practice. The course will also include preparation for a culminating public presentation of capstone projects. Throughout the course students will continuously examine the group process to better understand and apply leadership concepts to practice. Prerequisites: LEAD 549.

LEAD 590 | CURRICULUM DEVELOPMENT: ACESS, ASSESSMENT AND SCHOOL IMPROVEMENT I

Units: 3

This course is intended to provide students with both the practical and theoretical understanding of basic principles and issues in curriculum theory, content, planning, and the role of technology in accomplishing those tasks. Candidates must be confident in their ability to examine, explore, analyze, common core standards and results of student level data to guide decision making and reform efforts in the school building. This ability is guided by their knowledge and understanding of student assessment and data management.

LEAD 591 | CURRICULUM DEVELOPMENT: ACCESS, ASSESSMENT AND SCHOOL IMPROVEMENT II

Units: 2

This course will increase candidates’ ability to strategically implement appropriate and effective school improvement theories and strategies. Candidates will use school data to identify what is working, diagnosing needs, and identifying opportunities for growth and change. Candidates will develop capacity to communicate and lead others in continuous improvement and monitoring of these efforts based on student and school outcomes.

LEAD 593P | PRACTICUM IN LEADERSHIP COACHING

Units: 1 Repeatability: No

Prerequisites: LEAD 533 and LEAD 566

This course addresses individual, team and systems coaching practice. Students will present cases from their supervised coaching work to receive assessment and feedback from peers and professional coaches. Special attention will be given to helping the coaches integrate their learning throughout the program and apply it to their evolving coaching practice. To enroll Foundations in Leadership Coaching and/or Coaching and Mentoring courses or relevant other experience and permission of the instructor.

LEAD 594 | STUDENT AFFAIRS GRADUATE ASSISTANT SEMINAR

Units: 1.5 Repeatability: Yes (Can be repeated for Credit)

In this course students work together with faculty and student affairs practitioners to integrate the theory and knowledge base of the program course work with the experiential learning of the student’s internship in Student Affairs. This course supports the student’s individual development plan by asking them to analyze current events and issues in their work place and connect them to the broader higher education community. An emphasis on topics and skills related to professional culture, actioninquiry, organizational dynamics, developmental theory and diversity and inclusion will be made throughout the course. The application of student learning will be demonstrated through students’ ongoing individual electronic-portfolio development.

LEAD 595 | THESIS SUPERVISION

Units: 1-3

Students engaged in the research and writing of a thesis may register for 1-3 units of this course per semester duringthat process. Students should enroll with their thesis advisor only. This course can be counted towards electives in the are the area of specialization requirement and is a Pass/Fail course.

LEAD 597P | PRACTICUM IN SCHOOL ADMINISTRATION I

Units: 2 Repeatability: Yes (Can be repeated for Credit)

This intensive field-based residency experience integrates the theory and knowledge of the program coursework with the experiential learning through practice. The practicum supports the development of candidates’ knowledge, skills and dispositions through practical experience with instructional leadership, operational management and work with community stakeholders. Candidates meet routinely in triads with their supervising principal and university supervisor to discuss the candidate’s progress toward achieving leadership standards. Placements will be selected to ensure a learning environment that supports candidate learning in the critical areas of site leadership.

LEAD 598 | LEADERSHIP INTERNSHIP

Units: 3,6 Repeatability: Yes (Can be repeated for Credit)

Field placement for M.A. in Leadership Studies students in a new organizational role not previously mastered, under the guidance of an effective educational leader and supervised by a USD faculty member.

LEAD 598P | PRACTICUM IN SCHOOL ADMINISTRATION II

Units: 1-3 Repeatability: Yes (Can be repeated for Credit)

This intensive field-based residency experience integrates the theory and knowledge of the program coursework with the experiential learning through practice. The practicum supports the development of candidates’ knowledge, skills and dispositions through practical experience with instructional leadership, operational management and work with community stakeholders. Placements will be selected to ensure a learning environment that supports candidate learning in the critical areas of site leadership. When candidates have completed the second practicum and completed the coursework they will present their culminating portfolio and educational platform to a group of critical friends.

LEAD 599 | INDEPENDENT STUDY

Units: 0.5-3

Independent study designed for individual student needs. Students must complete the Application for Independent Study or Research form and obtain the signatures of the faculty supervisor, Department Chair and the AssociateDean prior to registering for the course.

LEAD 600 | INTEGRAL LEADERSHIP THEORY

Units: 3

This course provides an essential and theoretical understanding of leadership and authority and is designed as well to generate personal insights into one’s own patterns of response to social forces and skills for leadership. The course has a strong experiential component that continually provides participants with opportunity to test and integrate their learning with experience.

LEAD 602 | COMPETING CONCEPTIONS OF KNOWLEDGE AND RESEARCH

Units: 3

This course sets the stage for others in the doctoral program by providing students with a cognitive map of social science research as practiced in Leadership Studies, as well as in other disciplines and fields of study thai influence the interdisciplinary Leadership Studies field. More specifIcally, the course focuses on the nature of knowledge (sometimes referred to as epistemology) and the different types of research designs and methods that are associated with different epistemologies. The course also demonstrates that the sorts of conceptual disagreements found In the social sciences also can be found in leadership practice.

LEAD 607 | APPLIED STATISTICS AND QUANTITATIVE RESEARCH METHODS

Units: 3

Students examine a variety of quantitative research designs and select data collection and statistical analysis procedures appropriate to each design. Students interpret statistical computer output.

LEAD 608 | QUALITATIVE RESEARCH METHODS

Units: 3

The underlying philosophy of qualitative research, the type of research questions this method addresses and an overview of the major qualitative methodologies. Assignments provide guided practice in data collection, analysis and presentation of research, moving gradually toward more complex qualitative methodologies. Students acquire beginning skills in qualitative research and are able to critically evaluate qualitative studies in the literature.

LEAD 609 | EVALUATION: THEORY AND PRACTICE

Units: 3

Designed to develop an understanding of the evaluation process and skills needed by evaluators. Students review models of evaluation and examine strategies for conducting effective evaluations of organizations, programs and personnel.

LEAD 610 | DISSERTATION SEMINAR

Units: 3

A course to assist doctoral students who are ready to write their dissertation proposals. Students must have a firm topic for their research since they will write drafts of the three sections of their proposals and finish the course with a proposal that is ready for review by their dissertation committees.

LEAD 611 | LEADERSHIP THEORIES: PAST, PRESENT AND FUTURE

Units: 3

This course presents a comprehensive survey of leadership theories as one of the foundations of the doctoral program. Students will acquire the essential theoretical foundations of the field of leadership by examining the history of leadership thought, the current approaches, and the emerging trends in the field. The strengths, weaknesses, methodological elements and contributions of the various theories will be closely analyzed to prepare students for their continued research and practice throughout the program. The course relies on a cross and multi-disciplinary approach, and culture and ethics as study lenses.

LEAD 612 | ADVANCED QUALITATIVE RESEARCH METHODS

Units: 3

Prerequisites: LEAD 608

This course is divided into two main sections, one focusing on procedures associated with more or less traditional notions of qualitative research. Students will read and discuss texts and articles about qualitative methods and critique examples of both traditional and less conventional approaches to qualitative studies. In addition, a major assignment will be to design and execute a small qualitative study. Students will be expected to employ the datagenerated from their research to produce a number ofdifferent products.

LEAD 613 | ADVANCED QUANTITATIVE RESEARCH METHODS

Units: 3

Prerequisites: LEAD 607

This course provides students with the analytical tools necessary to conduct doctoral-level quantitative research and requires them to complete and present an empirical project. Topics covered include multiple regression analysis, binary choice models and time series analysis.

LEAD 614 | SPECIAL TOPICS IN ADVANCED RESEARCH METHODS

Units: 3

This course presents a variety of advanced quantitative and qualitative research methods special topics such as Mixed Methods, Advanced Multivariate Analysis, and Grounded Theory. It designed to prepare students to use a variety of research methods in their research by providing practical experience with the methods. Course meetings will consist of full-group sessions, small group/team sessions, and individual sessions with the instructor. Students taking this course should have successfully completed both basic doctoral-level quantitative and qualitative research methods courses and either an advanced quantitative or qualitative research course. Any students not meeting these prerequisite will need to receive the special approval of the instructor before formally enrolling in this course.

LEAD 615 | ACTION RESEARCH METHODS II

Units: 3

In this course, students read about, directly engage in, and write three papers using 1st-, 2nd-, and 3rd-person action research methods. For example, students research and write an autobiography in which they examine their life to date in terms of developmental theory as well as the next developmental actions they may wish to take (1st-person research). Each student will also analyze voice recordings of parts of different class sessions and write a paper to be shared with the rest of the class about the group's issues in evolving toward a "community of inquiry" (2nd-person research). And each student will write a final paper on an action research topic of their own choosing in journal article format (3rd-person research, at best illustrating how 1st-, 2nd-, and 3rd-person research interweave and contributing to the student's qualifying paper or dissertation).

LEAD 616 | SURVEY RESEARCH METHODS

Units: 3

This course will prepare students to design, implement and then analyze the results of different types of surveys. Topics to be covered include the analytics of survey research design, data collection and survey research analysis including the techniques of correlation and factor analysis, which will be used together to analyze the results of several large-scale surveys.

LEAD 619 | APPLIED LEADERSHIP PRACTICES: INTEGRAL SELF AND SYSTEMS APPROACH

Units: 3 Repeatability: No

This course offers a survey of classical, prevailing and emerging theories of human and organizational development. Students will be engaged in an integral self and systems approach to leadership. Particular emphasis will be placed on the development of the "self-as-instrument" while attending to the complex dynamics that are present in the contemporary organizational context The course blends an emphasis on mastery of conceptual frameworks with an experiential "theory-in-practice" orientation to learning. As such, students are offered an opportunity to bring an applied leadership perspective to their rigorous scholarly exploration of different dimensions of development commonly researched and encountered in the human and organizational condition.

LEAD 620 | THE LAW AND POLITICS OF EDUCATIONAL POLICY DEVELOPMENT

Units: 3

This course introduces an equal number of graduate education students and upper division law students to the complexities inherent in the development of education policy at the state and local levels. In addition to interacting with guest speakers during seminar sessions on campus, students travel to the Bay Area to meet with key researchers and commentators at Stanford University and at the UC-Berkeley School of Law and with union leaders at the California Teachers Association in Burlingame. Later, students travel to Sacramento to interact with key elected and appointed state policymakers. Field trip travel expenses are paid through a grant. Each student writes a research paper on a topic of the student’s choice related to educational policy development and delivers a presentation based on it to the seminar.

LEAD 621 | SOCIOLOGY OF EDUCATION AND EDUCATIONAL LEADERSHIP SEMINAR

Units: 3

This course serves as a foundation course for the Teaching, Learning and Leadership specialization. It takes as its point of departure the idea that educational outcomes are socially constructed. Using a sociological lens, structural, cultural and agentive explanations for the racialized, class-­based and gendered school experiences of US students will be examined. Moving from the macro to the micro level, students will examine schools as organizations embedded in broader socio-­cultural and historical context.

LEAD 622 | LEARNING DESIGN AND TECHNOLOGY

Units: 3

The goal of this course is to develop essential content and research expertise needed to exercise effective leadership in learning design and technology. The course examines key issues in learning design and the role of technology as a tool for effective educational practice. Students will be introduced to diverse theoretical and methodological frameworks to study learning design and technology, while investigating key contemporary issues in the field such as adaptive learning system, immersive learning environment, gamification, autonomous learning environment, learning analytics, global social media, coding literacy and digital equity. Students will study innovative learning design implementations with technology by encompassing the cognitive, affective and social dimensions of learning, through which meaningful design principles for effective educational solutions and leadership will be derived. Students will also design and pilot-test their own research on learning design and technology, while receiving constructive critiques from their peers and experts in the field.

LEAD 630 | THE NONPROFIT/PHILANTHROPIC STUDIES RESEARCH BASE

Units: 3

The primary purpose of this course is to help each course participant develop a cognitive map of research activity within the Nonprofit/Philanthropic Studies field. Specifically, the course will help participants become familiar with: (a) the topics and issues that scholars within the emerging field have begun to systematically study; (b) the methods they have employed-or have failed to employ-to study different topics and issues; and (c) the knowledge base about nonprofit and philanthropic organizations and their organizational practices that has begun to be created as a result of research focused on the third sector.

LEAD 631 | CONTEMPORARY ISSUES IN THE THIRD SECTOR

Units: 3

The domestic and international nonprofit sector faces persistent challenges around questions of effectiveness, accountability, governance, collaboration, and resource acquisition. Some of these issues raise fundamental questions about the legitimacy and future relevance of the nonprofit/NGO model as a form of political and social action. What can current academic research contribute to understanding some of the most persistent challenges faced by the sector? This course will review contemporary research evaluating nonprofit and NGO practices while also assessing the methodological and theoretical strengths and weaknesses of current scholarship focused on the sector.

LEAD 640 | CONTEMPORARY ISSUES IN HIGHER EDUCATION LEADERSHIP

Units: 3

This course examines contemporary issues facing leaders in the field of higher education, which includes but is not limited to autonomy and accountability, academic freedom, federal and state funding, curriculum reform, and economic imperatives. These issues will be examined from multiple perspectives, including internal and external constituencies. Key stakeholders will be identified and their interests will be analyzed to understand the complexity of decision making within a higher education leadership context.

LEAD 650 | ORGANIZATIONAL THEORY AND CHANGE

Units: 3

A critical review of classical and contemporary organizational theories and an examination of several models of organizational change. Strategies for facilitating change are also examined.

LEAD 660 | ETHICS AND LEADERSHIP

Units: 3

This is an applied ethics course that focuses on moral decision making by leaders and followers as they attempt to live with integrity as responsible individuals, members of society and citizens of the world. It provides students with a foundation in selected ethical theories, skills and tools for moral development using case studies, reflection and extensive discourse about leadership and ethics.

LEAD 661 | DECISION-MAKING UNDER CONDITIONS OF UNCERTAINTY

Units: 3

This course allows students to explore different models of decisionmaking in complex public and private organizations. Drawingon such analytical techniques as present discounted value, game theory, and costbenefit analysis, this course applies lessons from cognitive psychology, political science, traditional economics, behavioral economics, as well as other social scientific areas to domestic and international policymaking processes. In addition to extensive case studies, this course also uses policy simulations to help students understand how to use both theory and analytics to solve contemporary problems.

LEAD 662 | ADULT DEVELOPMENT

Units: 3

An examination of the conceptual frameworks that attempt to describe and explain adult development and their implications for leadership. Students refine their own evolving philosophy of leadership as they seek to understand the meaning of central concepts related to self and relationships.

LEAD 663 | LITERATURE REVIEW

Units: 3 Repeatability: No

LEAD 679 | EXPERIMENTAL TOPICS

Units: 1-3 Repeatability: Yes (Can be repeated for Credit)

This course number is used by SOLES for experimental topics courses. The title and content of each 679 course will vary by topic and program/department. If more than one 679 course is offered during a single semester, section numbers will allow for identification of the course.

LEAD 695 | DISSERTATION

Units: 1-9 Repeatability: Yes (Can be repeated for Credit)

Doctoral candidates must maintain continuous enrollment until the dissertation is completed. Only the grade of pass is awarded for this course, which is individually guided by the dissertation chair and committee members.

LEAD 698 | LEADERSHIP INTERNSHIP

Units: 3,6 Repeatability: Yes (Can be repeated for Credit)

Field placement for doctoral students in a new organizational role not previously mastered, under the guidance of an effective educational leader and supervised by a USD faculty member.

LEAD 699 | INDEPENDENT STUDY

Units: 1-6

Independent study designed for individual student needs. Students must complete the Application for Independent Study or Research form and obtain the signatures of the faculty supervisor, Department Chair and the Associate Dean prior to registering for the course.