Engineering

The BS/BA in Engineering degree (GENG) provides students with a unique education in the field of engineering by both educating students across multiple areas of engineering and allowing them to focus on a particular area of interest. Unlike most engineering majors that develop deep knowledge in one discipline, the GENG degree encourages students to complement their comprehensive liberal arts education with a broad technical experience. This provides students with the interdisciplinary perspective and problem-solving skills needed to succeed in a wide range of engineering and non-engineering careers. The general engineering program should appeal to students that have broad interests and desire to explore more than one disciplinary area.

The ENGR program has three main components:

  • math, science, and engineering fundamentals provides a core base of knowledge to support further work in engineering design and analysis

  • a concentration or individual plan of study that allows students to develop specialized skills

  • additional electives allow students to either take more courses in their concentration area or pursue complementary interests in other areas that will help them achieve long-term career and educational goals

The Shiley-Marcos School of Engineering is developing several concentrations for the GENG program. The first concentration available is in Embedded Software (ESW). Embedded software focuses on software development to control or monitor devices that are typically part of a larger system. For example, ESW graduates might develop software to control autonomous vehicles, monitor power systems, or control communication networks. Future concentrations under development include sustainability, engineering and law, and bioengineering. Contact the school for the latest information on those programs.  Students who do not pursue an established concentration will work with their advisor to develop an individual plan of study that meets their specific education and professional goals.

The educational objectives of the USD BS/BA in Engineering program are to develop graduates who:

  • are able to apply their broad engineering and broad liberal arts backgrounds in their professional and personal endeavors

  • can adapt to evolving job responsibilities

  • collaborate with others as members or leaders of engineering or multidisciplinary teams

To achieve these objectives, the GENG program has been designed to ensure that graduates have achieved the following outcomes:

  • an ability to apply knowledge of mathematics, science, and engineering
  • an ability to design and conduct experiments, as well as to analyze and interpret data
  • an ability to design a system, component, or process to meet desired needs within realistic constraints such as economic, environmental, social, political, ethical, health and safety, manufacturability, and sustainability
  • an ability to function on multi-disciplinary teams
  • an ability to identify, formulate, and solve engineering problems
  • an understanding of professional and ethical responsibility
  • an ability to communicate effectively
  • the broad education necessary to understand the impact of engineering solutions in a global, economic, environmental, and societal context
  • a recognition of the need for, and an ability to engage in life-long learning
  • a knowledge of contemporary issues [in the profession]
  • an ability to use the techniques, skills, and modern engineering tools necessary for engineering practice.
  • an ability to apply knowledge of probability and statistics to applications in electrical engineering

 Requirements for the General Engineering Major: 147 semester units

All general engineering majors must satisfy the core curriculum specified by the university.  The mathematics, science, and engineering courses listed below also satisfy the core curriculum requirements in mathematics competency, scientific and technological inquiry, advanced writing, and the level 1 diversity, inclusion and social justice (DISJ) requirement.

Preparation for the Major:

Mathematics and Science Requirements (32-33 units):
MATH 150Calculus I4
MATH 151Calculus II4
MATH 250Calculus III 14
MATH 310Applied Mathematics for Science and Engineering I3
ISYE 330Engineering Probability and Statistics3
PHYS 270
270L
Introduction to Mechanics
and Mechanics Lab
4
PHYS 271
271L
Introduction to Electricity and Magnetism
and Introduction to Electricity and Magnetism Lab
4
CHEM 151
151L
General Chemistry I
and General Chemistry I Laboratory
4
Add'l Math or Science 23
Engineering Core Requirements (12 units)
ENGR 101Introduction to Engineering3
ENGR 102Introduction to Electromechanical System Design3
ENGR 103User-Centered Design3
ENGR 121Engineering Programming3
or COMP 150 Computer Programming I
1

 Students selecting the embedded software concentration may substitute a math or science class for MATH 250.  Consult an academic advisor for a list of approved alternatives.

2

 The additional Math or Science class will depend on the concentration selected.  Consult an academic advisor for more information.

The Major

Students selecting the BS/BA in Engineering fulfill the requirement for the major by completing a set of common engineering breadth courses required by all students in the major, and by either 1) completing the requirements in a concentration or 2) working with an advisor to develop a plan of study that includes classes from several disciplines to meet individual professional goals. 

Required Engineering Breadth Courses for all General Engineering Options

ELEC 201
201L
Electrical Circuits
and Electrical Circuits Lab
4
ELEC 340Digital Design4
ENGR 311Engineering Materials Science3
ISYE 380Sustainability and Engineering3
MENG 210Statics3
MENG 260Introduction to Thermal Sciences3
GENG 221Software Foundations3
GENG 350Engineering and Social Justice3
GENG 360Experimental Engineering3
GENG 491Engineering Senior Design I4
GENG 492Engineering Senior Design II3

Option 1: Embedded Software Concentration (ESW) (29 units total)

Embedded software engineering focuses on software development to control or monitor devices that are typically part of a larger system. For example, ESW graduates might develop software to control autonomous vehicles, monitor power systems, or control communication networks.

COMP 280Introduction to Computer Systems3.5
COMP 310Operating Systems3.5
COMP 385Compiler Construction3
COMP 300Principles of Digital Hardware4
COMP 375Networking3
GENG 421Embedded Systems Performance3
Approved Concentration Electives6
Math or Science Elective3

Option 2: Individual Plan of Study (IPS) (27 Units total)

Students may work with a faculty advisor to define a curriculum plan that meets their specific educational and professional goals.  In addition to the BS/BA in Engineering required classes, students must develop a plan that includes at least 27 units of coursework including at least 3 units of math/science and at least 6 units of engineering classes.

Math or Science elective3
Approved Engineering classes6
Approved IPS electives18

Recommended Program of Study: Embedded Software Concentration (147 Units)

First Year
Semester IHours
ENGR 101Introduction to Engineering3
MATH 150Calculus I4
CHEM 151
151L
General Chemistry I4
Or 
ENGR 121
or COMP 150
Engineering Programming
Computer Programming I
3
CC Electives6
Semester II
ENGR 102
or 103
Introduction to Electromechanical System Design
User-Centered Design
3
MATH 151Calculus II4
ENGR 121
or COMP 150
Engineering Programming
Computer Programming I
3
Or 
CHEM 151
151L
General Chemistry I4
PHYS 270
270L
Introduction to Mechanics4
CC Elective3
Sophomore Year
Semester I
ENGR 103
or 102
User-Centered Design
Introduction to Electromechanical System Design
3
MATH 310Applied Mathematics for Science and Engineering I3
PHYS 271
271L
Introduction to Electricity and Magnetism4
CC Electives6
Semester II
ELEC 201Electrical Circuits4
GENG 221Software Foundations3
MENG 210Statics3
MENG 260Introduction to Thermal Sciences3
MATH 294Special Topics (Discrete Math)3
Junior Year
Semester I
ENGR 311Engineering Materials Science3
GENG 350Engineering and Social Justice3
ISYE 330Engineering Probability and Statistics3
COMP 280Introduction to Computer Systems3.5
CC Elective3
Semester II
GENG 360Experimental Engineering3
ISYE 380Sustainability and Engineering3
COMP 310Operating Systems3.5
COMP 385Compiler Construction3
CC Elective3
Senior Year
Semester I
COMP 300Principles of Digital Hardware4
ELEC 340Digital Design4
GENG 491Engineering Senior Design I4
CC Elective3
Math/Science Elective3
Semester II
COMP 375Networking3
GENG 421Embedded Systems Performance3
GENG 492Engineering Senior Design II3
CC Electives6
Senior Year 2
Semester I
CC Electives6
Free Electives11

Recommended Program of Study: Individual Plan of Study (147 Units)

First Year
Semester IHours
ENGR 101Introduction to Engineering3
MATH 150Calculus I4
CHEM 151
151L
General Chemistry I4
Or 
ENGR 121
or COMP 150
Engineering Programming
Computer Programming I
3
CC Electives6
Semester II
ENGR 102
or 103
Introduction to Electromechanical System Design
User-Centered Design
3
MATH 151Calculus II4
ENGR 121
or COMP 150
Engineering Programming
Computer Programming I
3
Or 
CHEM 151
151L
General Chemistry I4
PHYS 270
270L
Introduction to Mechanics4
CC Elective3
Sophomore Year
Semester I
ENGR 103
or 102
User-Centered Design
Introduction to Electromechanical System Design
3
MATH 310Applied Mathematics for Science and Engineering I3
PHYS 271
271L
Introduction to Electricity and Magnetism4
CC Electives6
Semester II
ELEC 201Electrical Circuits4
GENG 221Software Foundations3
MENG 210Statics3
MENG 260Introduction to Thermal Sciences3
MATH 250Calculus III4
Junior Year
Semester I
ELEC 340Digital Design4
ENGR 311Engineering Materials Science3
GENG 350Engineering and Social Justice3
ISYE 330Engineering Probability and Statistics3
IPS Elective4
Semester II
GENG 360Experimental Engineering3
ISYE 380Sustainability and Engineering3
IPS Electives11
Senior Year
Semester I
GENG 491Engineering Senior Design I4
IPS Electives7
CC Elective6
Semester II
GENG 492Engineering Senior Design II3
IPS Electives7
CC Electives6
Senior Year 2
Semester I
CC Electives3
Free Electives10

Courses

GENG 221 | SOFTWARE FOUNDATIONS

Units: 3 Repeatability: No

Prerequisites: ENGR 101 and ENGR 121 and MATH 150 and MATH 151 (Can be taken Concurrently) and PHYS 270 (Can be taken Concurrently)

Introduction to Object Oriented Programming in Python. Implementation and use of data structures including arrays, structures, classes, stacks, lists, and trees in C and Python.

GENG 350 | ENGINEERING AND SOCIAL JUSTICE

Units: 3 Repeatability: No

Prerequisites: ENGR 102 and ENGR 103

This course aims to support students understanding of engineering in relation to social justice. It will help students develop critical thinking skills and to apply these to the context of engineering practices and systems. Students will consider the historical and contemporary contexts and impacts of the designs, systems, processes and products surrounding and involving engineering and engineers. The course will be taught in intensive mode, with interactive lectures, workshops and seminars, together with a team project, where students will apply their learning to research a local community need.

GENG 360 | EXPERIMENTAL ENGINEERING

Units: 3 Repeatability: No

Prerequisites: ENGR 102 and ELEC 201 and MENG 210 and MENG 260 and ENGR 311

Engineers rely heavily on data when making decisions. This is a course about how engineers collect, analyze, and present data. In this course, students will be introduced to fundamental principles of measurement and instrumentation through a series of hands on experiments in several engineering contexts, including designing your own experiment. Technical communication skills are an integral part of sharing data, therefore both written and oral communication will be taught this class. Every Spring.

GENG 421 | EMBEDDED SYSTEMS PERFORMANCE

Units: 3 Repeatability: No

Prerequisites: COMP 385

This course will focus on the application of all available processing power to implement system solutions. Parallel processing, core sequestration, processor affinity, CPU programming, DSP programming, and the integration of disparate processing elements via OpenCL will all be addressed in this course. The impact of coherent and non-coherent memory models will be addressed and the notion of data hazards in non-coherent systems will be detailed. We will also consider the application specific impacts of the relative power efficiency of alternative processing models.

GENG 491 | ENGINEERING SENIOR DESIGN I

Units: 4 Repeatability: No

Prerequisites: (GENG 350 and GENG 360) or (ELEC 302 and ELEC 310 and ELEC 350) or (MENG 430 and MENG 435)

Proposal and design phase of a capstone project culminating in a documented and approved engineering design project to be implemented in ENGR 492. Computer-aided electrical, mechanical, software, math, science and other discipline design techniques are used to study design alternatives and support the final design selection: evaluation of ethical, cultural, economic, societal, and safety considerations in the design process. The development of individual and group written and oral communication skills. This course prepares students to approach an engineering design project in a small team. Topics include project selection, research methods on chosen project, a review of the design process, including concept generation, concept selection, construction, testing, and evaluation. Fall semester.

GENG 492 | ENGINEERING SENIOR DESIGN II

Units: 3 Repeatability: No

Prerequisites: GENG 491

Engineering capstone design experience in a realistic engineering environment that applies and integrates engineering and nonengineering topics. Students work in teams, in collaboration with engineering faculty and/or engineering professionals from industry, on an open-ended design project. This involves design, construction, testing and evaluation as well as consideration of issues related to culture, ethics, economics, social justice, safety and professional practice. Course also includes documentation of design project including written reports and oral presentations to multiple audiences. Spring semester.

Chair

Susan Lord, PhD

Faculty

Caroline Baillie, DEng

Diana Chen, PhD

Gordon Hoople, PhD

Joel Alejandro Mejia, PhD