Honors (HNRS)

Courses

HNRS 300 | PROBLEMS OF HISTORY, MEMORY, MAGIC IN THE ART AND LITERATURE OF THE AMERICAS

Units: 4

Prerequisites: Passing the appropriate departmental placement test within the previous year

HNRS 301 | PROBLEMS OF HISTORY, MEMORY, MAGIC IN THE ART AND LITERATURE OF THE AMERICAS

Units: 4

Prerequisites: Passing the appropriate departmental placement test within the previous year

HNRS 302 | EAST ASIA: NUKES, NARCOTICS AND NATIONALISM

Units: 4

Prerequisites: Passing the appropriate departmental placement test within the previous year

As East Asia assumes growing importance in a globalized world, economically, culturally and geopolitically, there is increasing interest among our students in acquiring an in-depth and nuanced understanding of East Asian countries, primarily China, Japan and the two Koreas. A team-taught Honors course that connects the historical experiences and current developments in East Asia will meet such academic and intellectual needs of the students. It will deal with several important aspects of East Asia – the historical roots and developments of nationalism in the said countries, the intricate relations among them, and the impact of their respective domestic and foreign policies on international security as well as East Asia’s relations with the United States and the rest of the world.

HNRS 303 | EAST ASIA: NUKES, NARCOTICS AND NATIONALISM

Units: 4

Prerequisites: Passing the appropriate departmental placement test within the previous year

As East Asia assumes growing importance in a globalized world, economically, culturally and geopolitically, there is increasing interest among our students in acquiring an in-depth and nuanced understanding of East Asian countries, primarily China, Japan and the two Koreas. A team-taught Honors course that connects the historical experiences and current developments in East Asia will meet such academic and intellectual needs of the students. It will deal with several important aspects of East Asia – the historical roots and developments of nationalism in the said countries, the intricate relations among them, and the impact of their respective domestic and foreign policies on international security as well as East Asia’s relations with the United States and the rest of the world.

HNRS 304 | THE (SOCIAL) CAPITAL OF SOCIAL MEDIA

Units: 4 Repeatability: No

Media platforms that allow for computer-mediated interactions and sharing of information, coined “social media,” have become important components of everyday life in an increasingly digital world. Indeed, social media are inescapable. Individuals have the power to connect with others across the world or across the table using social media. The social media evolution has also afforded businesses new and innovative ways to sell products and services. The academic study of social media is still in its infancy, though communication scholars have initiated research examining the multifaceted nature and influence of social media as they relate to our psyche, our relationships, and the way our society functions. Marketing researchers have also focused attention on the pivotal role social media play in consumer behavior and business practices. This course attempts to merge two disciplines with great interest in social media—communication studies and marketing—and, in turn, seeks to provide students with a comprehensive understanding of what it means to exist as citizens and consumers in the age of social media.

HNRS 305 | THE FACEBOOK PHENOMENON: THE (SOCIAL) CAPITAL OF SOCIAL MEDIA

Units: 4

Prerequisites: Passing the appropriate departmental placement test within the previous year

Facebook is among the foundational players in the evolution of social media. Media platforms that allow for computer-mediated interactions and sharing of information, coined “social media,” have become important components of everyday life in an increasingly digital world. Indeed, social media are inescapable. Individuals have the power to connect with others across the world or across the table using social media. The social media evolution has also afforded businesses new and innovative ways to sell products and services. The academic study of social media is still in its infancy, though communication scholars have initiated research examining the multifaceted nature and influence of social media as they relate to our psyche, our relationships, and the way our society functions. Marketing researchers have also focused attention on the pivotal role social media play in consumer behavior and business practices. This course attempts to merge two disciplines with great interest in social media—communication studies and marketing—and, in turn, seeks to provide students with a comprehensive understanding of what it means to exist as citizens and consumers in the age of social media.

HNRS 306 | EDUCATION & INCARCERATION: MANIFESTATIONS OF SOCIAL MARGINALITY IN THE CONTEMPORARY UNITED STATES (4

Units: 4

Prerequisites: Passing the appropriate departmental placement test within the previous year

Education and crime are two of the most persistent and daunting social problems in the contemporary United States. The correlation between social marginality, limited educational opportunities and contact with the criminal justice system is significant and longstanding. This course will marshal and integrate cornerstone theoretical frameworks from the sociology of education and criminology to facilitate a depth-oriented and critical examination of this issue. We will also require students to engage in active learning through community service work at either a school site or criminal justice site (coordinated through the Center for Awareness, Service and Action office). Students will develop final projects in pairs: one student at an education community service site paired with another student at a criminal justice site. While a daunting task, the crescendo of the course will ask students to build from existing literature and their own hands-on experiences to craft policy suggestions that would potentially improve this issue.

HNRS 307 | EDUCATION & INCARCERATION: MANIFESTATIONS OF SOCIAL MARGINALITY IN THE CONTEMPORARY UNITED STATES (4

Units: 4

Prerequisites: Passing the appropriate departmental placement test within the previous year

Education and crime are two of the most persistent and daunting social problems in the contemporary United States. The correlation between social marginality, limited educational opportunities and contact with the criminal justice system is significant and longstanding. This course will marshal and integrate cornerstone theoretical frameworks from the sociology of education and criminology to facilitate a depth-oriented and critical examination of this issue. We will also require students to engage in active learning through community service work at either a school site or criminal justice site (coordinated through the Center for Awareness, Service and Action office). Students will develop final projects in pairs: one student at an education community service site paired with another student at a criminal justice site. While a daunting task, the crescendo of the course will ask students to build from existing literature and their own hands-on experiences to craft policy suggestions that would potentially improve this issue.

HNRS 308 | POWER AND POLITICS

Units: 4

Prerequisites: Passing the appropriate departmental placement test within the previous year

This course covers the analysis, explanation and evaluation of power and politics in organizations. It offers frameworks for assessing the sources of power in organizations, the conditions that lead to its attainment and its effective use from both a practical and an ethical perspective. Discussions will cover how people in organizations try to get what they want by influencing others, how their ability to do so is affected by power distributions and how people try to change power distributions in their favor. We will evaluate these behaviors and discuss how (if at all) we should participate in these behaviors.

HNRS 309 | POWER AND POLITICS

Units: 4

Prerequisites: Passing the appropriate departmental placement test within the previous year

This course covers the analysis, explanation and evaluation of power and politics in organizations. It offers frameworks for assessing the sources of power in organizations, the conditions that lead to its attainment and its effective use from both a practical and an ethical perspective. Discussions will cover how people in organizations try to get what they want by influencing others, how their ability to do so is affected by power distributions and how people try to change power distributions in their favor. We will evaluate these behaviors and discuss how (if at all) we should participate in these behaviors.

HNRS 310 | THE HISTORY AND POLITICS OF SOUTH AFRICA

Units: 4

Prerequisites: Passing the appropriate departmental placement test within the previous year

This course will examine the origins of segregation and aparteid in the history of South Africa and assess the prospects for a successful political and economic transformation in the post-aparteid era. During the semester students will explore the origins of the most significant event in the precolonial era, the Zulu mfecane; assess the role of the 'frontier' in shaping South Africa's past; identify the relative significance of race and class in explaining the nature of South Africa's historical development; trace the development of colonialism under British rule and aparteid under Afrikaner rule; evaluate the nature and importance of Afrikaner nationalist ideology in the emergence of the aparteid system; determine the nature and direction of African nationlism in the twentieth century; explore the militarization of the South African state in the 1980s; appraise the underlying factors giving rise to negotiations after 1990;p study the role and effects of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission; examine the development of democratic institutions at the national and local levels since 1994; and examine the constraints to peaceful change since 1994, including poverty and unemployment, the AIDS crisis, and the rising crime rate.

HNRS 311 | THE HISTORY AND POLITICS OF SOUTH AFRICA

Units: 4

This course will examine the origins of segregation and aparteid in the history of South Africa and assess the prospects for a successful political and economic transformation in the post-aparteid era. During the semester students will explore the origins of the most significant event in the precolonial era, the Zulu mfecane; assess the role of the 'frontier' in shaping South Africa's past; identify the relative significance of race and class in explaining the nature of South Africa's historical development; trace the development of colonialism under British rule and aparteid under Afrikaner rule; evaluate the nature and importance of Afrikaner nationalist ideology in the emergence of the aparteid system; determine the nature and direction of African nationlism in the twentieth century; explore the militarization of the South African state in the 1980s; appraise the underlying factors giving rise to negotiations after 1990;p study the role and effects of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission; examine the development of democratic institutions at the national and local levels since 1994; and examine the constraints to peaceful change since 1994, including poverty and unemployment, the AIDS crisis, and the rising crime rate.

HNRS 312 | ETHICAL ISSUE MEDGEN

Units: 4

Prerequisites: Passing the appropriate departmental placement test within the previous year

HNRS 313 | POLLUTION IN SAND

Units: 4

Prerequisites: Passing the appropriate departmental placement test within the previous year

HNRS 314 | SOUND & SPIRIT/ASIA

Units: 3-6

Prerequisites: Passing the appropriate departmental placement test within the previous year

HNRS 315 | SHAKESPEARE: TEXT AND PERFORMANCE

Units: 4

Prerequisites: Passing the appropriate departmental placement test within the previous year

HNRS 316 | SHAKESPEARE: TEXT AND PERFORMANCE

Units: 4

Prerequisites: Passing the appropriate departmental placement test within the previous year

HNRS 317 | EXTREME BIOCHEMISTRY

Units: 3-6

Prerequisites: Passing the appropriate departmental placement test within the previous year

HNRS 318 | COMPUTER ETHICS

Units: 3-6

Prerequisites: Passing the appropriate departmental placement test within the previous year

HNRS 319 | SEX POLITICS & LITERARY CONSIOUSNESS

Units: 3-6

Prerequisites: Passing the appropriate departmental placement test within the previous year

HNRS 320 | APOCALYPSE: THEN AND NOW: COLD WAR & POST COLD WAR MILITARY INTERVENTIONS

Units: 4

Prerequisites: Passing the appropriate departmental placement test within the previous year

With the Cold War’s end in 1989 and the Soviet collapse in late 1991, President Clinton’s CIA nominee in 1993 warned against emerging security threats to the United States saying, “yes, we have slain a large dragon, but we now live in a jungle filled with a bewildering variety of poisonous snakes.” Indeed, President George H.W. Bush’s expectation of a new world order underpinned by cooperation among the major powers has proven to be chimerical. Military interventions during the Cold War occurred in contested areas all over the world as the United States and the Soviet Union jockeyed for power and influence. These interventions saw the interplay of both ideology and interests with complex geopolitical and strategic goals that often overlooked the national aspirations and needs of the target states, many of which were far more concerned with the process of decolonization than Cold War imperatives. Such interventions have continued during the post-Cold War period for humanitarian and economic reasons, to preserve geo-political dominance, and in order to combat what is increasingly viewed as the new menace—terrorism.

HNRS 321 | APOCALYPSE: THEN AND NOW: COLD WAR & POST COLD WAR U.S. MILITARY INTERVENTIONS

Units: 4

Prerequisites: Passing the appropriate departmental placement test within the previous year

With the Cold War’s end in 1989 and the Soviet collapse in late 1991, President Clinton’s CIA nominee in 1993 warned against emerging security threats to the United States saying, “yes, we have slain a large dragon, but we now live in a jungle filled with a bewildering variety of poisonous snakes.” Indeed, President George H.W. Bush’s expectation of a new world order underpinned by cooperation among the major powers has proven to be chimerical. Military interventions during the Cold War occurred in contested areas all over the world as the United States and the Soviet Union jockeyed for power and influence. These interventions saw the interplay of both ideology and interests with complex geopolitical and strategic goals that often overlooked the national aspirations and needs of the target states, many of which were far more concerned with the process of decolonization than Cold War imperatives. Such interventions have continued during the post-Cold War period for humanitarian and economic reasons, to preserve geo-political dominance, and in order to combat what is increasingly viewed as the new menace—terrorism.

HNRS 322 | IT'S ABOUT TIME

Units: 4

Prerequisites: Passing the appropriate departmental placement test within the previous year

Time lies at the heart of the human condition and science’s description of the natural world. Nothing ’happens’ without it. Despite its seeming familiarity it remains elusive, mysterious, paradoxical in nature. This team-taught, upper-division honors class will explore the phenomenon of time through the lenses of literature and physics.

HNRS 323 | IT'S ABOUT TIME

Units: 4

Prerequisites: Passing the appropriate departmental placement test within the previous year

Time lies at the heart of the human condition and science’s description of the natural world. Nothing ’happens’ without it. Despite its seeming familiarity it remains elusive, mysterious, paradoxical in nature. This team-taught, upper-division honors class will explore the phenomenon of time through the lenses of literature and physics.

HNRS 324 | PHYSICAL AND CHEMICAL APPLICATIONS OF LASERS

Units: 4

Prerequisites: Passing the appropriate departmental placement test within the previous year

HNRS 325 | SUSTAINABILITY FOR ALL: SCIENCE AND GLOBAL JUSTICE

Units: 4

Prerequisites: Passing the appropriate departmental placement test within the previous year

HNRS 326 | DISPARITIES IN HEALTH CARE

Units: 4

Prerequisites: Passing the appropriate departmental placement test within the previous year

This course examines the ethics and politics of racial disparity and inequality in U. S. health care.

HNRS 327 | DISPARITIES IN HEALTH CARE

Units: 4

This course examines the ethics and politics of racial disparity and inequality in U. S. health care.

HNRS 328 | INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS NEGOTIATION

Units: 4

Prerequisites: Passing the appropriate departmental placement test within the previous year

HNRS 329 | GLOBAL JUSTICE: WAR AND PEACE

Units: 4

Prerequisites: Passing the appropriate departmental placement test within the previous year

HNRS 330 | CÉSAR CHÁVEZ, LABOR, AND CATHOLIC SOCIAL JUSTICE

Units: 4

Prerequisites: Passing the appropriate departmental placement test within the previous year

César Chávez is best known as a labor organizer and civil rights champion for farm workers and the disenfranchised in the United States. In this course, we situate Chavez into the history of the Civil Rights Movement, the Labor movement, and the teachings of the Catholic Church in support of social justice and human dignity. We look at the roots of Catholicism's social action agenda and examine both its achievements and contradictions as a religious institution. We also examine the image and symbol of Chavez as both a pious individual and a larger than life charismatic leader within the political narrative of civil rights during this historical period.

HNRS 331 | THE WORLD OF AUGUSTINE

Units: 4

Prerequisites: Passing the appropriate departmental placement test within the previous year

HNRS 332 | THE GOOD LIFE

Units: 4

Prerequisites: Passing the appropriate departmental placement test within the previous year

HNRS 333 | RELIGIOUS AND POLITICAL IDENTITIES IN THE GLOBAL COMMUNITY

Units: 4

Prerequisites: Passing the appropriate departmental placement test within the previous year

HNRS 334 | CONSTRUCTION OF CULTURE: MYTH, IDEOLOGY & THE POPULAR MIND

Units: 4

Prerequisites: Passing the appropriate departmental placement test within the previous year

HNRS 335 | INTRODUCTION TO SHAKESPEARE: PERFORMANCE AND TEXT

Units: 4

Prerequisites: Passing the appropriate departmental placement test within the previous year

HNRS 336 | APOCALYPSE: THEN AND NOW: COLD WAR & POST COLD WAR U.S. MILITARY INTERVENTIONS

Units: 4 Repeatability: No

Prerequisites: Passing the appropriate departmental placement test within the previous year

With the Cold War’s end in 1989 and the Soviet collapse in late 1991, President Clinton’s CIA nominee in 1993 warned against emerging security threats to the United States saying, “yes, we have slain a large dragon, but we now live in a jungle filled with a bewildering variety of poisonous snakes.” Indeed, President George H.W. Bush’s expectation of a new world order underpinned by cooperation among the major powers has proven to be chimerical. Military interventions during the Cold War occurred in contested areas all over the world as the United States and the Soviet Union jockeyed for power and influence. These interventions saw the interplay of both ideology and interests with complex geopolitical and strategic goals that often overlooked the national aspirations and needs of the target states, many of which were far more concerned with the process of decolonization than Cold War imperatives. Such interventions have continued during the post-Cold War period for humanitarian and economic reasons, to preserve geo-political dominance, and in order to combat what is increasingly viewed as the new menace—terrorism.

HNRS 337 | APOCALYPSE: THEN AND NOW: COLD WAR & POST COLD WAR U.S. MILITARY INTERVENTIONS

Units: 4 Repeatability: No

Prerequisites: Passing the appropriate departmental placement test within the previous year

With the Cold War’s end in 1989 and the Soviet collapse in late 1991, President Clinton’s CIA nominee in 1993 warned against emerging security threats to the United States saying, “yes, we have slain a large dragon, but we now live in a jungle filled with a bewildering variety of poisonous snakes.” Indeed, President George H.W. Bush’s expectation of a new world order underpinned by cooperation among the major powers has proven to be chimerical. Military interventions during the Cold War occurred in contested areas all over the world as the United States and the Soviet Union jockeyed for power and influence. These interventions saw the interplay of both ideology and interests with complex geopolitical and strategic goals that often overlooked the national aspirations and needs of the target states, many of which were far more concerned with the process of decolonization than Cold War imperatives. Such interventions have continued during the post-Cold War period for humanitarian and economic reasons, to preserve geo-political dominance, and in order to combat what is increasingly viewed as the new menace—terrorism.

HNRS 338 | PLAGUE, POLITICS, PRESERVATION: THE ENVIRONMENT IN ANTIQUITY

Units: 4 Repeatability: No

Humanity’s fraught relationship with its natural environment is arguably the most important issue of our time. Many scientists agree that we are living at the beginning of a new era – the Anthropocene – in which human activities have an unprecedented impact on Earth’s ecosystems. Debate continues, however, about precisely when this “new” era began. While some scholars link the beginning of the Anthropocene to the later half of the twentieth century or the beginning of the Industrial Revolution, others assert that we should look further back. This course will examine the beginning of humanity’s efforts to mold the natural world to suit its needs, tracing a direct line from the environmental issues of our own time to the invention of agriculture and urbanism in the Neolithic Revolution. We will seek the beginnings of the Anthropocene, in other words, in the very foundations of human civilization as we know it. Using case studies from ancient Mesopotamia, Egypt, Greece, and Rome, we will examine ancient peoples’ changing relationship with the natural world, focusing on issues such as the sacredness of nature; resource use, degradation, and scarcity; disease and other environmental health factors; and early conceptions of conservation and preservation.

HNRS 339 | PLAGUE, POLITICS, PRESERVATION: THE ENVIRONMENT IN ANTIQUITY

Units: 4 Repeatability: No

Humanity’s fraught relationship with its natural environment is arguably the most important issue of our time. Many scientists agree that we are living at the beginning of a new era – the Anthropocene – in which human activities have an unprecedented impact on Earth’s ecosystems. Debate continues, however, about precisely when this “new” era began. While some scholars link the beginning of the Anthropocene to the later half of the twentieth century or the beginning of the Industrial Revolution, others assert that we should look further back. This course will examine the beginning of humanity’s efforts to mold the natural world to suit its needs, tracing a direct line from the environmental issues of our own time to the invention of agriculture and urbanism in the Neolithic Revolution. We will seek the beginnings of the Anthropocene, in other words, in the very foundations of human civilization as we know it. Using case studies from ancient Mesopotamia, Egypt, Greece, and Rome, we will examine ancient peoples’ changing relationship with the natural world, focusing on issues such as the sacredness of nature; resource use, degradation, and scarcity; disease and other environmental health factors; and early conceptions of conservation and preservation.

HNRS 340 | POETRY IN TRANSLATION

Units: 4

Prerequisites: Passing the appropriate departmental placement test within the previous year

HNRS 341 | TRIANGLE OF EMANCIPATION

Units: 4

Prerequisites: Passing the appropriate departmental placement test within the previous year

HNRS 342 | DEAD MEN WALKING: CAPITAL PUNISHMENT IN THE UNITED STATES

Units: 4 Repeatability: No

Prerequisites: Passing the appropriate departmental placement test within the previous year

Explores the legal, ethical and literary dimensions of the national debate over the death penalty. Class readings and discussions supplemented by guest speakers and films. Short essays, final exam, and a semester long research project on a San Diego capital case.

HNRS 343 | DEAD MEN WALKING: CAPITAL PUNISHMENT IN THE UNITED STATES

Units: 4 Repeatability: No

Prerequisites: Passing the appropriate departmental placement test within the previous year

Explores the legal, ethical and literary dimensions of the national debate over the death penalty. Class readings and discussions supplemented by guest speakers and films. Short essays, final exam, and a semester long research project on a San Diego capital case.

HNRS 345 | SEX, POLITICS & LITERARY

Units: 4

Prerequisites: Passing the appropriate departmental placement test within the previous year

HNRS 346 | SOUND AND SPIRIT

Units: 4

Prerequisites: Passing the appropriate departmental placement test within the previous year

HNRS 347 | COMPUTER ETHICS

Units: 4

Prerequisites: Passing the appropriate departmental placement test within the previous year

HNRS 348 | TRASH: MODERNITY & EVACUATION

Units: 3-4

Prerequisites: Passing the appropriate departmental placement test within the previous year

HNRS 349 | CULTURAL CONSTRUCTION OF MOTHERHOOD

Units: 4

Prerequisites: Passing the appropriate departmental placement test within the previous year

HNRS 350 | CULTURAL CONST OF MOTHERHOOD

Units: 3-4

Prerequisites: Passing the appropriate departmental placement test within the previous year

HNRS 351 | PRODUCT DEVELOPMENT & DESIGN USING SIX SIGMA

Units: 4

Prerequisites: Passing the appropriate departmental placement test within the previous year and ISYE 330

HNRS 352 | PRODUCT DEVELOPMENT & DESIGN USING SIX SIGMA

Units: 4

Prerequisites: Passing the appropriate departmental placement test within the previous year and ISYE 330

HNRS 353 | TRASH: MODERNITY & EVACUATION

Units: 4

Prerequisites: Passing the appropriate departmental placement test within the previous year

HNRS 354 | CULTURAL CONSTRUCTION OF MOTHERHOOD: IDEOLOGIES, PRACTICES, AND CONTRADICTIONS

Units: 4

Prerequisites: Passing the appropriate departmental placement test within the previous year

HNRS 355 | CULTURAL CONSTRUCTION OF MOTHERHOOD: IDEOLOGIES, PRACTICES, AND CONTRADICTIONS

Units: 4

Prerequisites: Passing the appropriate departmental placement test within the previous year

HNRS 356 | CULTURAL CONSTRUCTION OF MOTHERHOOD: IDEOLOGIES, PRACTICES, AND CONTRADICTIONS

Units: 4

Prerequisites: Passing the appropriate departmental placement test within the previous year

HNRS 357 | THE HIDDEN CONNECTIONS

Units: 4

Prerequisites: Passing the appropriate departmental placement test within the previous year

HNRS 358 | THE HIDDEN CONNECTIONS

Units: 4

Prerequisites: Passing the appropriate departmental placement test within the previous year

HNRS 359 | DEATH AND AFTERLIFE: METAPHYSICAL AND RELIGIOUS PERSPECTIVES

Units: 4

Prerequisites: Passing the appropriate departmental placement test within the previous year

HNRS 360 | DEATH AND AFTERLIFE: METAPHYSICAL AND RELIGIOUS PERSPECTIVES

Units: 4

Prerequisites: Passing the appropriate departmental placement test within the previous year

HNRS 361 | STUDIES IN MODERN PALESTINIAN ART AND LITERATURE

Units: 4

Prerequisites: Passing the appropriate departmental placement test within the previous year

HNRS 362 | STUDIES IN MODERN PALESTINIAN ART AND LITERATURE

Units: 4

Prerequisites: Passing the appropriate departmental placement test within the previous year

HNRS 363 | STUDIES IN MODERN PALESTINIAN ART AND LITERATURE

Units: 4

Prerequisites: Passing the appropriate departmental placement test within the previous year

HNRS 364 | WOMEN IN ISLAM AND CONFUCIANISM

Units: 4

Prerequisites: Passing the appropriate departmental placement test within the previous year

HNRS 365 | WOMEN IN ISLAM AND CONFUCIANISM

Units: 4

Prerequisites: Passing the appropriate departmental placement test within the previous year

HNRS 366 | VOTING AND DEMOCRACY

Units: 4

Prerequisites: Passing the appropriate departmental placement test within the previous year

HNRS 367 | VOTING AND DEMOCRACY

Units: 4

Prerequisites: Passing the appropriate departmental placement test within the previous year

HNRS 368 | CONFLICT DIAGNOSIS & DISPUTE RESOLUTION IN A GLOBAL ENVIRONMENT

Units: 4

Prerequisites: Passing the appropriate departmental placement test within the previous year

HNRS 369 | CONFLICT DIAGNOSIS & DISPUTE RESOLUTION IN A GLOBAL ENVIRONMENT

Units: 4

Prerequisites: Passing the appropriate departmental placement test within the previous year

HNRS 370 | PSYC/ECOL OF ENVI CHALLENGES

Units: 4

Prerequisites: Passing the appropriate departmental placement test within the previous year

HNRS 371 | PSYC/ECOL OF ENVI CHALLENGES

Units: 4

Prerequisites: Passing the appropriate departmental placement test within the previous year

HNRS 372 | REL/PEACEBUILDING/GLOBAL JUS

Units: 4

Prerequisites: Passing the appropriate departmental placement test within the previous year

HNRS 373 | REL/PEACEBUILDING/GLOBAL JUS

Units: 4

Prerequisites: Passing the appropriate departmental placement test within the previous year

HNRS 374 | MEX REVOLUTION IN HIST & LIT

Units: 4

Prerequisites: Passing the appropriate departmental placement test within the previous year

HNRS 375 | MEX REVOLUTION IN HIST & LIT

Units: 4

Prerequisites: Passing the appropriate departmental placement test within the previous year

HNRS 376 | DIGITAL REPRESENTATION IN ARCHITECTURE

Units: 4

Prerequisites: Passing the appropriate departmental placement test within the previous year

HNRS 377 | DIGITAL REPRESENTATION IN ARCHITECTURE

Units: 4

Prerequisites: Passing the appropriate departmental placement test within the previous year

HNRS 378 | DIGITAL REPRESENTATION IN ARCHITECTURE

Units: 4

Prerequisites: Passing the appropriate departmental placement test within the previous year

HNRS 379 | INTERDISCIPLINARY SEMINAR IN ENVIRONMENTAL STUDIES

Units: 4

Prerequisites: Passing the appropriate departmental placement test within the previous year

HNRS 380 | INTERDISCIPLINARY SEMINAR IN ENVIRONMENTAL STUDIES

Units: 4

Prerequisites: Passing the appropriate departmental placement test within the previous year

HNRS 381 | INTERDISCIPLINARY SEMINAR IN ENVIRONMENTAL STUDIES

Units: 4

Prerequisites: Passing the appropriate departmental placement test within the previous year

HNRS 382 | PRISON: COMMUNICATION AND CULTURE

Units: 4 Repeatability: No

Prerequisites: Passing the appropriate departmental placement test within the previous year

This course marshals cornerstone communication studies theory as a lens into understanding the dynamic and contentious lived experience of prison culture. This interdisciplinary, cross-cultural, critical investigation of prison culture demands a mastery of the seminal theoretical perspectives on group formation and interaction within and beyond the incarceration experience. America has over 2 million people behind bars, with the lion’s share residing in state and federal prisons. There is a bountiful legacy of scholarship that examines the power dynamics, lived experiences and culture behind bars; in short, both culture and communication matter. The complex social interactions within these institutions follow similar patterns to those studied in the more traditional cultures outside the prison walls. This course will use communication theory from a small group and interpersonal perspective to allow understanding and explanation of the unique way that communication – and general social interaction – shapes individual experiences upon incarceration. From initial first-impression stages of relationship development to the complex ways that people structure and negotiate impressions in order to send messages to perceived “others”, communication theorists have much to say about the nature and structure of communication events within the contraventions of the prison system.

HNRS 383 | PRISON: COMMUNICATION AND CULTURE

Units: 4

Prerequisites: Passing the appropriate departmental placement test within the previous year

HNRS 384 | COSMOPOLITANISM: CULTURE HYBRIDITY AND THE GLOBAL

Units: 4

Prerequisites: Passing the appropriate departmental placement test within the previous year

This course explores the idea of cosmopolitanism on a grand scale, taking examples from civilizations and cultures ancient and contemporary. We hope to show that at various important junctures in history and in different places around the world, the question of the cosmopolitanism¿an important facet of what we might call global awareness¿has found powerful expression in the works of diverse thinkers and artists. Diogenes the Cynic, from Sinope in Asia Minor (c. 410 BCE), is credited with the concept of the cosmopolitan: When asked from whence he hailed, he answered with no small irony that he was a kosmopolites, a citizen of the world. Following the anti-colonist wars of independence in the 12th century, cosmopolitanism became something of a dirty word. It was seen to evoke Eurocentrism and elitism, recalling the hegemony of the European colonial powers and presuming their cultural superiority. This course re-allies itself not with the elitist notion of the cosmopolitan but rather looks back to its roots in the subversive ethic implicit in Diogenes¿ statement---one that privileges diversity and interconnectedness. To that end, we will discuss works of philosophy, history, literature, and art that break with prevailing, accepted ideologies.

HNRS 385 | COSMOPOLITANISM: CULTURE HYBRIDITY AND THE GLOBAL

Units: 4

Prerequisites: Passing the appropriate departmental placement test within the previous year

This course explores the idea of cosmopolitanism on a grand scale, taking examples from civilizations and cultures ancient and contemporary. We hope to show that at various important junctures in history and in different places around the world, the question of the cosmopolitanism¿an important facet of what we might call global awareness¿has found powerful expression in the works of diverse thinkers and artists. Diogenes the Cynic, from Sinope in Asia Minor (c. 410 BCE), is credited with the concept of the cosmopolitan: When asked from whence he hailed, he answered with no small irony that he was a kosmopolites, a citizen of the world. Following the anti-colonist wars of independence in the 12th century, cosmopolitanism became something of a dirty word. It was seen to evoke Eurocentrism and elitism, recalling the hegemony of the European colonial powers and presuming their cultural superiority. This course re-allies itself not with the elitist notion of the cosmopolitan but rather looks back to its roots in the subversive ethic implicit in Diogenes¿ statement---one that privileges diversity and interconnectedness. To that end, we will discuss works of philosophy, history, literature, and art that break with prevailing, accepted ideologies.

HNRS 386 | EARTH, WATER, AIR, FIRE, LIFE!

Units: 4

Prerequisites: Passing the appropriate departmental placement test within the previous year

This course will introduce you to fundamental scientific advances in the Origin of Life research in chemistry and geology, so that you will have a basis to critically assess the claims and counter-claims made about how life began. You will learn the basic principles of how atoms and molecules are formed from processes at work in the Universe and you will be exposed to the latest research both in chemistry (examining how a proto-cell and its complex constituents might be self-assembled from simpler molecules) and in geology (examining the search for evidence of water on Early Earth). This course will fulfill the physical science Core Curriculum requirement and is particularly suitable for non-science majors who are interested in the science of the Origin of Life.

HNRS 387 | EARTH, WATER, AIR, FIRE, LIFE!

Units: 4

Prerequisites: Passing the appropriate departmental placement test within the previous year

This course will introduce you to fundamental scientific advances in the Origin of Life research in chemistry and geology, so that you will have a basis to critically assess the claims and counter-claims made about how life began. You will learn the basic principles of how atoms and molecules are formed from processes at work in the Universe and you will be exposed to the latest research both in chemistry (examining how a proto-cell and its complex constituents might be self-assembled from simpler molecules) and in geology (examining the search for evidence of water on Early Earth). This course will fulfill the physical science Core Curriculum requirement and is particularly suitable for non-science majors who are interested in the science of the Origin of Life.

HNRS 388 | US WOMEN OF COLOR THEORY ACTIVISM

Units: 4

Prerequisites: Passing the appropriate departmental placement test within the previous year

This interdisciplinary course traces the development of US Women of Color feminist theory and its impact on social activism and artistic expression. Students will learn how Chicana, Indigenous, Arab American, African American, and Asian American women engaged the unstated biases of mainstream feminist movements and invented a critical approach that accounted for differences of race, sexual orientation, class, and religion. Drawing on literature, history, sociology, public policy, film and video, students will analyze how US Women of Color writers and activists have shaped new social movements and created expressions that address the critical issues of our time, including immigration, the right to language and culture, reproductive justice, and decolonization.

HNRS 389 | US WOMEN OF COLOR THEORY ACTIVISM

Units: 4

Prerequisites: Passing the appropriate departmental placement test within the previous year

This interdisciplinary course traces the development of US Women of Color feminist theory and its impact on social activism and artistic expression. Students will learn how Chicana, Indigenous, Arab American, African American, and Asian American women engaged the unstated biases of mainstream feminist movements and invented a critical approach that accounted for differences of race, sexual orientation, class, and religion. Drawing on literature, history, sociology, public policy, film and video, students will analyze how US Women of Color writers and activists have shaped new social movements and created expressions that address the critical issues of our time, including immigration, the right to language and culture, reproductive justice, and decolonization.

HNRS 390 | SOUND AND SPIRIT IN SOUTH AND SOUTHEAST ASIA

Units: 4

Prerequisites: Passing the appropriate departmental placement test within the previous year

In this course, we will examine the history of Hinduism, Buddhism, and Islam in South and Southeast Asia and trace their incorporation into Southeast Asian kingdoms. We will contrast these with the indigenous traditions of diverse hill peoples who resisted incorporation into the large kingdoms of Southeast Asia. We will examine a number of the musical traditions that arose within these interacting religious civilizations, and examine some of the diverse indigenous animist beliefs and cultural practices that persist in the modern context. Music, whether in ceremony, entertainment, or daily life, is a vehicle for the enactment and transmission of religious, artistic and cultural values. Tracing the common religious threads from South Asia through Southeast Asia, we will reveal the underlying beliefs and aesthetics that link cultures across the region, as well as clarify the distinctions resulting from local circumstances, indigenous cultural practices, other transregional influences, and idiosyncratic fusions of changing belief systems.

HNRS 391 | SOUND AND SPIRIT IN SOUTH AND SOUTHEAST ASIA

Units: 4

Prerequisites: Passing the appropriate departmental placement test within the previous year

In this course, we will examine the history of Hinduism, Buddhism, and Islam in South and Southeast Asia and trace their incorporation into Southeast Asian kingdoms. We will contrast these with the indigenous traditions of diverse hill peoples who resisted incorporation into the large kingdoms of Southeast Asia. We will examine a number of the musical traditions that arose within these interacting religious civilizations, and examine some of the diverse indigenous animist beliefs and cultural practices that persist in the modern context. Music, whether in ceremony, entertainment, or daily life, is a vehicle for the enactment and transmission of religious, artistic and cultural values. Tracing the common religious threads from South Asia through Southeast Asia, we will reveal the underlying beliefs and aesthetics that link cultures across the region, as well as clarify the distinctions resulting from local circumstances, indigenous cultural practices, other transregional influences, and idiosyncratic fusions of changing belief systems.

HNRS 392 | IMMIGRANT AMERICAS

Units: 4

The course explores the artistic motifs and symbolism employed in the dissemination of Buddhist culture throughout Asia from the fifth century BCE yntil the present day. Using a variety of media, it examines pictorial representations of Buddhist thought, history, myth, gender, and human ideals. Using visual culture as a primary lens, the course travels from the premodern to the contemporary era. Starting from India, it moves along the Silk Road to China, Korea, and Japan; across the Himalayas to Nepal, Tibet, Mongolia; by sea to Sri Lanka, Indonesia, Thailand, and Vietnam; and, finally, to the buddhist diaspora in Europe and North America.

HNRS 393 | IMMIGRANT AMERICAS

Units: 4

The course explores the artistic motifs and symbolism employed in the dissemination of Buddhist culture throughout Asia from the fifth century BCE yntil the present day. Using a variety of media, it examines pictorial representations of Buddhist thought, history, myth, gender, and human ideals. Using visual culture as a primary lens, the course travels from the premodern to the contemporary era. Starting from India, it moves along the Silk Road to China, Korea, and Japan; across the Himalayas to Nepal, Tibet, Mongolia; by sea to Sri Lanka, Indonesia, Thailand, and Vietnam; and, finally, to the buddhist diaspora in Europe and North America.

HNRS 394 | IMAGES OF ENLIGHTENMENT: BUDDHISM IN VISUAL CULTURE

Units: 4

Prerequisites: Passing the appropriate departmental placement test within the previous year

HNRS 395 | IMAGES OF ENLIGHTENMENT: BUDDHISM IN VISUAL CULTURE

Units: 4

Prerequisites: Passing the appropriate departmental placement test within the previous year

HNRS 396 | NEUROBIOLOGY & BEHAVIOR

Units: 4

Prerequisites: Passing the appropriate departmental placement test within the previous year and PSYC 101 and PSYC 342 and BIOL 190 and BIOL 225 and BIOL 225L

Students will learn about the neuronal basis of behavior, first focusing on the cellular, molecular and electrical properties of the neuron as the functional unit of the nervous system. These concepts will then be integrated with an examination of higher nervous functions - especially, simple forms of learning and memory. Concepts to be mastered include the ionic basis of resting and action potentials, characteristics of electrical current flow in cells properties of receptors and ion channels, fundamentals of electrical and chemical synaptic transmission, and the biochemical and neurophysiological bases for simple forms of learning and memory. Forms of learning to understand will include habituation, sensitization, associative learning and classical conditioning. we will examine how assemblies of neurons mediate sensation, process information and control behavior.

HNRS 397 | NEUROBIOLOGY AND BEHAVIOR

Units: 4

Prerequisites: Passing the appropriate departmental placement test within the previous year and PSYC 101 and PSYC 342 and BIOL 190 and BIOL 225 and BIOL 225L

Students will learn about the neuronal basis of behavior, first focusing on the cellular, molecular and electrical properties of the neuron as the functional unit of the nervous system. These concepts will then be integrated with an examination of higher nervous functions - especially, simple forms of learning and memory. Concepts to be mastered include the ionic basis of resting and action potentials, characteristics of electrical current flow in cells properties of receptors and ion channels, fundamentals of electrical and chemical synaptic transmission, and the biochemical and neurophysiological bases for simple forms of learning and memory. Forms of learning to understand will include habituation, sensitization, associative learning and classical conditioning. we will examine how assemblies of neurons mediate sensation, process information and control behavior.

HNRS 398 | MUSIC, BORDERS, IDENTITIES

Units: 4

Prerequisites: Passing the appropriate departmental placement test within the previous year

HNRS 399 | MUSIC. BORDERS, IDENTITIES

Units: 4

Prerequisites: Passing the appropriate departmental placement test within the previous year

HNRS 495 | HONORS SENIOR THESIS SEMINAR

Units: 1-4

Prerequisites: Passing the appropriate departmental placement test within the previous year

HNRS 496 | HONORS THESIS PREP

Units: 1-4

Prerequisites: Passing the appropriate departmental placement test within the previous year

HNRS 497 | UNDERGRADUATE TEACHING ASSISTANT

Units: 1 Repeatability: Yes (Can be repeated for Credit)

Prerequisites: Passing the appropriate departmental placement test within the previous year

HNRS 499 | INDEPENDENT STUDY

Units: 1-4 Repeatability: Yes (Repeatable if topic differs)

Prerequisites: Passing the appropriate departmental placement test within the previous year